Bone Broth and How I Fight Winter Colds

Happy cold and flu season! Ugh the kiddo and hubby got hit hard this weekend as the weather shifted from 65 degrees to 30 degrees overnight, literally. On a happy note, since little one joined us in bed last night and coughed into my open mouth, no less than 20 times, I’m sure I’ll be joining the sick party soon. I have my arsenal ready though! I just made a fresh batch of elderberry syrup.  I was going to make a recipe for you guys, but this one is so good that I decided it isn’t worth it to reinvent the wheel, yet. I use the elderberry syrup for the kiddo and then I put it in tea for me to support my immune system on a sporadic basis or when I’m coming down with something. I also make gummies out of it. In addition to the elderberry syrup, I will often add raw apple cider vinegar to my teas for an additional punch. If I really start getting hit, I will take some oregano oil supplements and/or use some colloidal silver throat spray if it is starting in my throat. (Note: I’m not telling you to do this, I’m telling you what I do, sometimes, when I feel like it).

The biggest thing I do though, is defrost some bone broth that I always keep on hand and make soups or just drink it as a warm beverage. This weekend I used some leftover chicken from our meal prep, carrots, and celery to make a chicken soup. I added noodles for the kiddo and rice for me. This stuff is so easy and so delicious. I save bones (most often from roasted chickens) in the freezer until I have enough and I either make it in my slow cooker or instant pot, but usually my instant pot. Then the whole house doesn’t smell like soup!

Why is bone broth good for us, especially in regards to illness? Well, bone broth contains a variety of ingredients including collagen and glutamine which are particularly important when it comes to our gut (our intestines).  Not only can it be soothing but also healing as well. The combination of minerals and amino acids found in homemade (or very few high quality store bought products) provides so much support to our intestinal lining which is where 80% of our immune system lives. If your gut isn’t healthy, you won’t be healthy. Standard, store bought broth isn’t the same. The majority of broths that provide the same benefits as homemade can only be found in the freezer.  Kettle and Fire is the only one I know of that is shelf stable.

Let’s get to it, shall we?

Print Recipe
Bone Broth
A simple, no frills, gut healing bone broth recipe
Prep Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 24 hours
Servings
quarts
Ingredients
  • 2-4 lbs bones preferably including some neck bones, knuckle bones, or other highly cartilaginous bones
  • 4 quarts water or enough water to cover the bones
  • 2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 Tablespoons sea salt
  • 6 cloves garlic optional (I often just add garlic if I make something out of the broth because I don't always want garlic first thing)
Prep Time 15 minutes
Passive Time 24 hours
Servings
quarts
Ingredients
  • 2-4 lbs bones preferably including some neck bones, knuckle bones, or other highly cartilaginous bones
  • 4 quarts water or enough water to cover the bones
  • 2 Tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 Tablespoons sea salt
  • 6 cloves garlic optional (I often just add garlic if I make something out of the broth because I don't always want garlic first thing)
Instructions
  1. Place bones in slow cooker or electric pressure cooker.
  2. Cover with water.
  3. Add vinegar and salt (and garlic if using).
Slow Cooker
  1. Cook for 24-48 hours on low.
  2. Allow to cool and store in airtight containers for up to a week in the refrigerator or up to 6 months in the freezer.
Electric Pressure Cooker
  1. Set manual high pressure for 2 hours, then let it remain on keep warm overnight.
  2. It will likely already by cool enough to place into jars in the morning to freeze for up to 6 months or refrigerate for up to a week.
Recipe Notes

This broth can be used as-is in drink fashion or be used in any soup or stew or even as cooking liquid for rice, etc. as a 1:1 water replacement.

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